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Why Did You Join Your Online Business
Category: GENERAL
Tags: online business promotions marketing

Why Did You Join Your Online Business? Was it to Earn Money? READ THIS!

Why did you join your  online business.

Was it only to earn money?

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Until we speak or meet Have Fantastic days and may great wealth and great

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At your service,

Rickey

www.jusmcc.org

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THE JAPANESE NEW YEARS HAS A LOT OF TRADITION
Category: GENERAL
Tags: JAPAN JAPAN NEW YEAR TRADITION JAPAN NEW YEAR CUSTOMS JAPAN MULTICULTURAL CONNECTION

 

JMCC community get to learn about the tradition, beliefs, and activities of  the multi cultural world we live in.

It is exciting to learn about the different cultures that "touch" of all. 

 

The Japanese New Year (正月 shōgatsu?) is an annual festival with its own customs. The preceding days are quite busy, particularly the day before, known as Ōmisoka. The Japanese New Year has been celebrated since 1873 according to the Gregorian calendar, on January 1 of each year (New Year's Day where the Gregorian calendar is used). In Okinawa, the cultural New Year is still celebrated as the contemporary ChineseKorean, and Vietnamese New Years.

History

Prior to the Meiji period, the date of the Japanese New Year was based on the Chinese lunar calendar, as are the contemporary ChineseKorean, and Vietnamese New Years. However, in 1873, five years after the Meiji RestorationJapan adopted the Gregorian calendar and the first day of January became the official and cultural New Year's Day. In the Ryukyu Islands, a separate cultural New Year is still celebrated based on the Chinese lunar calendar.

 

Traditional food

Japanese people eat a special selection of dishes during the New Year celebration called osechi-ryōri (御節料理 or お節料理?), typically shortened to osechi. This consists of boiled seaweed (昆布 konbu?), fish cakes (蒲鉾 kamaboko?), mashed sweet potato withchestnut (栗きんとん kurikinton?), simmered burdock root (金平牛蒡 kinpira gobō?), and sweetened black soybeans (黒豆kuromame?). Many of these dishes are sweet, sour, or dried, so they can keep without refrigeration—the culinary traditions date to a time before households had refrigerators, when most stores closed for the holidays. There are many variations of osechi, and some foods eaten in one region are not eaten in other places (or are considered unfortunate or even banned) on New Year's Day. Another popular dish is ozōni (お雑煮?), a soup with mochi rice cake and other ingredients that differ based on various regions of Japan. Today,sashimi and sushi are often eaten, as well as non-Japanese foods. To let the overworked stomach rest, seven-herb rice soup (七草粥nanakusa-gayu?) is prepared on the seventh day of January, a day known as jinjitsu (人日?).

 

Bell ringing

At midnight on December 31, Buddhist temples all over Japan ring their bells a total of 108 times (除夜の鐘 joyanokane) to symbolize the 108 human sins in Buddhist belief, and to get rid of the 108 worldly desires regarding sense and feeling in every Japanese citizen. A major attraction is The Watched Night bell, in Tokyo. Japanese believe that the ringing of bells can rid off their sins during the previous year. After they are done ringing the bells, they celebrate and feast on soba noodles.

 

The end of December and the beginning of January are the busiest times for the Japanese post offices. The Japanese have a custom of sending New Year's Day postcards (年賀状nengajō?) to their friends and relatives, similar to the Western custom of sending Christmas cards. Their original purpose was to give your faraway friends and relatives tidings of yourself and your immediate family. In other words, this custom existed for people to tell others whom they did not often meet that they were alive and well.

Japanese people send these postcards so that they arrive on 1 January. The post office guarantees to deliver the greeting postcards on 1 January if they are posted within a time limit, from mid-December to near the end of the month and are marked with the wordnengajō. To deliver these cards on time, the post office usually hires students part-time to help deliver the letters.

It is customary not to send these postcards when one has had a death in the family during the year. In this case, a family member sends a simple postcard called mochū hagaki (喪中葉書?, mourning postcards) to inform friends and relatives they should not send New Year's cards, out of respect for the deceased.

People get their nengajō from many sources. Stationers sell preprinted cards. Most of these have the Chinese zodiac sign of the New Year as their design, or conventional greetings, or both. The Chinese zodiac has a cycle of 12 years. Each year is represented by an animal. The animals are, in order: rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog, and boar. 2008 was the year of the rat, 2009 ox, 2010 tiger, 2011 rabbit and 2012 is the year of the dragon. Famous characters like Snoopy, (2006) and other cartoon characters like Mickey and Minnie Mouse, (2008) have been especially popular in their celebrated years.

Addressing is generally done by hand, and is an opportunity to demonstrate one's handwriting (see shodō). The postcards may have spaces for the sender to write a personal message. Blank cards are available, so people can hand-write or draw their own. Rubber stamps with conventional messages and with the annual animal are on sale at department stores and other outlets, and many people buy ink brushes for personal greetings. Special printing devices are popular, especially among people who practice crafts. Software also lets artists create their own designs and output them using their computer's color printer. Because a gregarious individual might have hundreds to write, print shops offer a wide variety of sample postcards with short messages so that the sender has only to write addresses. Even with the rise in popularity of email, the nengajō remains very popular in Japan.

Conventional nengajō greetings include:

·         kotoshi mo yoroshiku o-negai-shimasu (今年もよろしくお願いします?) (I hope for your favour again in the coming year)

·         (shinnen) akemashite o-medetō-gozaimasu ((新年)あけましておめでとうございます?) (Happiness to you on the dawn [of a New Year])

·         kinga shinnen (謹賀新年?) (Happy New Year)

·         gashō (賀正?) (to celebrate January)

·         shoshun/hatsuharu (初春?) (literally "early spring", in traditional lunar calendar a year begin in early spring)

·         geishun (迎春?) (to welcome spring)

 

 

Otoshidama

 

 

Pouch for giving otoshidama calledotoshidama-bukuro (お年玉袋?).

On New Year's Day, Japanese people have a custom of giving money to children. This is known as otoshidama (お年玉?). It is handed out in small decorated envelopes called 'pochibukuro,' similar to Shūgi-bukuro or Chinese red envelopes and to the Scottish handsel. In the Edo period large stores and wealthy families gave out a small bag of mochi and aMandarin orange to spread happiness all around. The amount of money given depends on the age of the child but is usually the same if there is more than one child so that no one feels slighted. It is not uncommon for amounts greater than ¥10,000 (US$120) to be given.

 

Mochi

Another custom is creating rice cakes (餅 mochi?). Boiled sticky rice (餅米 mochigome?) is put into a wooden shallow bucket-like container and patted with water by one person while another person hits it with a large wooden mallet. Mashing the rice, it forms a sticky whitedumpling. This is made before New Year's Day and eaten during the beginning of January.

Mochi is made into a New Year's decoration called kagami mochi (鏡餅?), formed from two round cakes of mochi with a tangerine (橙daidai?) placed on top. The name daidai is supposed to be auspicious since it means "several generations."

Because of mochi's extremely sticky texture, there is usually a small number of choking deaths around New Year in Japan, particularly amongst the elderly. The death toll is reported in newspapers in the days after New Year.[1]

 

Poetry

The New Year traditions are also a part of Japanese poetry, including haiku (17 syllable poems) and renga (linked poetry). All of the traditions above would be appropriate to include in haiku as kigo (season words). There are also haiku that celebrate many of the "first" of the New Year, such as the "first sun" (hatsuhi) or "first sunrise", "first laughter" (waraizome—starting the New Year with a smile is considered a good sign), and first dream (hatsuyume). Since the traditional New Year was later in the year than the current date, many of these mention the beginning of spring.

Along with the New Year's Day postcard, haiku might mention "first letter" (hatsudayori—meaning the first exchange of letters), "firstcalligraphy" (kakizome), and "first brush" (fude hajime).

 

Games

It was also customary to play many New Year's games. These include hanetsukitakoage (kite flying), koma (top), sugoroku,fukuwarai (whereby a blindfolded person places paper parts of a face, such as eyes, eyebrows, a nose and a mouth, on a paper face), and karuta.

 

Entertainment

There are many shows created as the end-of-year, and beginning-of-year entertainment, and some being a special edition of the regular shows. For many decades, it has been customary to watch the TV show Kōhaku Uta Gassen aired on NHK on New Year's Eve. The show features two teams, red and white, of popular music artists competing against each other.

 

Beethoven's Ninth

Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, with accompanying chorus, is traditionally performed throughout Japan during the New Years season. In December 2009, for example, there were 55 performances of the symphony by various major orchestras and choirs in Japan.[2]

The Ninth was introduced to Japan by German prisoners-of-war held in Japan during World War I. Japanese orchestras, notably theNHK Symphony Orchestra, began performing the symphony in 1925. During World War II, the Imperial government promoted performances of the symphony, including on New Year's Eve, to encourage allegiance to Japanese nationalism. The symphony was considered appropriate in this regard because Nazi Germany was an ally of Japan. After the war, orchestras and choruses, undergoing economic hard times during the reconstruction of Japan, promoted performances of the piece around New Years because of the popularity of the music with the public. In the 1960s, performances of the symphony at New Years became more widespread, including participation by local choirs and orchestras, and established the tradition which continues to this day.[3]

 

Hatsumōde, hatsuhinode, the "firsts" of the year

Celebrating the new year in Japan also means paying special attention to the first time something is done in the new year.

Hatsuhinode (初日の出) is the first sunrise of the year. Before sunrise on January 1, people often drive to the coast or climb a mountain so that they can see the first sunrise of the new year.

Hatsumōde is the first trip to a shrine or temple. Many people visit a shrine after midnight on December 31 or sometime during the day on January 1. If the weather is good, people often dress up or wear kimono.

In addition to the other firsts mentioned above ("first sun" (hatsuhi) or "first sunrise", "first laughter" (waraizome—starting the New Year with a smile is considered a good sign), first dream (初夢, hatsuyume), and "first letter" (hatsudayori—meaning the first exchange of letters) – in addition to haiku-specific ones), other "firsts" that are marked as special events include shigoto-hajime (仕事始め, the first work of the new year), keiko-hajime (稽古始め, the first practice of the new year), hatsugama (the first tea ceremony of the new year), and the hatsu-uri (the first shopping sale of the new year).

 

Little New Year

There is also an associated festival of Little New Year (小正月 koshōgatsu?), traditionally celebrating the first full moon of the new year, on the 15th day of the first lunar month (approximately mid-February). This is now sometimes celebrated on January 15th, in various respects. The main events of Koshōgatsu are rites and practices praying for a bountiful harvest, and 小豆粥 is traditionally eaten in the morning. Further, New Year decorations are taken down around this date, and some temples hold events, such as at Tōrin-in; see also festivals at List of Important Intangible Folk Cultural Properties.

source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_New_Year

Japanese New Year First Meal
Category: GENERAL
Tags: osechi japanese new year japanese customs japanense foods japan custom japan culture

Hello JMCC community. New Year represents something to everyone. For some the start of anew, other letting go of a past. For some it brings tradition to be honored. Japan has a new year day tradition.

 

Osechi-ryōri (御節料理 or お節料理) are traditional Japanese New Year foods. The tradition started in the Heian Period (794-1185). Osechi are easily recognizable by their special boxes called jūbako (重箱), which resemblebentō boxes. Like bentō boxes, jūbako are often kept stacked before and after use.


The dishes that make up osechi each have a special meaning celebrating the New Year. Some examples are:Examples of osechi dishes

  • Daidai (橙), Japanese bitter orangeDaidai means "from generation to generation" when written in different kanji as 代々. Like kazunoko below, it symbolizes a wish for children in the New Year.
  • Datemaki (伊達巻 or 伊達巻き), sweet rolled omelette mixed with fish paste or mashed shrimp. They symbolize a wish for many auspicious days. On auspicious days (晴れの日, hare-no-hi), Japanese people traditionally wear fine clothing as a part of enjoying themselves. One of the meanings associated with the second kanji includes "fashionability," derived from the illustrious dress of the samurai from Date Han.
  • Kamaboko (蒲鉾), broiled fish cake. Traditionally, slices of red and whitekamaboko are alternated in rows or arranged in a pattern. The color and shape are reminiscent of Japan rising sun, and have a celebratory, festive meaning.
  • Kazunoko (数の子), herring roeKazu means "number" and ko means "child." It symbolizes a wish to be gifted with numerous children in the New Year.
  • Konbu (昆布), a kind of seaweed. It is associated with the word yorokobu, meaning "joy."
  • Kuro-mame (黒豆), black soybeansMame also means "health," symbolizing a wish for health in the New Year.
  • Kohaku-namasu (紅白なます), literally "red-white vegetable kuai," is made of daikon and carrot cut into thin strips and pickled in sweetened vinegar with yuzu flavor.
  • Tai (鯛), red sea-breamTai is associated with the Japanese word medetai, symbolizing an auspicious event.
  • Tazukuri (田作り), dried sardines cooked in soy sauce. The literal meaning of the kanji in tazukuri is "rice paddy maker," as the fish were used historically to fertilize rice fields. The symbolism is of an abundant harvest.
  • Zōni (雑煮), a soup of mochi rice cakes in clear broth (in eastern Japan) ormiso broth (in western Japan).
  • Ebi (エビ), skewered prawns cooked with sake and soy sauce.
  • Nishiki tamago (錦卵), egg roulade; the egg is separated before cooking, yellow symbolizing gold, and white symbolizing silver.

 

HIstory

 

The term osechi originally referred to o-sechi, a season or significant period. New Year's Day was one of the five seasonal festivals (節句sekku) in the Imperial Court in Kyoto. This custom of celebrating particular days was introduced from China into Japan.

Originally, during first three days of the New Year it was a taboo to use a hearth and cook meals, except when cooking zōni. Osechi was made by the close of the previous year, as women did not cook in the New Year.

In the earliest days, osechi consisted only of nimono, boiled vegetables with soy sauce and sugar or mirin. Over the generations, the variety of food included in osechi has increased. Today osechi may refer to anything prepared specially for the New Year, and some foreign dishes have been adopted as "Westernized osechi" (西洋お節 seiyō-osechi) or as "Chinese-style osechi" (中華風お節 chūkafū osechi). And while osechi was traditionally prepared at home, it is also sold ready-made in specialty stores, grocery stores, and even convenience stores, such as 7-Eleven.

Especially in households where osechi is still homemade, toshi-koshi soba (年越し蕎麦) is eaten on New Year's Eve. Its name literally means "year-crossing soba." Although there may be some symbolism attributed to it (i.e., long life, health and energy in the upcoming year), this tradition may be regarded as largely pragmatic: the traditional wife, busy cooking several days' worth of food for everyone, would likely prefer to make something simple for immediate consumption. It is considered bad luck by many Japanese to leave anytoshi-koshi soba uneaten

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osechi

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